The Marriage of Jack and Betty McCall

The Cedar Grove Items column of the December 21, 1933 edition of the Berryville Star Progress announced the marriage of Jack McCall and Vella “Betty” Southerland. It’s interesting that when they applied for the marriage license at the courthouse on December 4th, they are recorded as “Jack McCall, 22, of Eureka Springs” and “Vella Southerland, 18, of Rockhouse”. This article, however, is even more geographically precise by indicating the bride is from Cedar Grove and the groom is from the Walker Settlement.

John Southerland Furlough

The enforcement of prohibition laws complicated the life of John Benton Southerland on several occasions. He was 54 years old in August 1928 when convicted by the Carroll County (Arkansas) Circuit Court and sent to prison. This article from the October 17, 1929 edition of the Berryville Star Progress newspaper reports he’ll be released after the Arkansas governor granted him a furlough.

Homesteading

This is a summary of homesteading by the ancestors of Jack and Betty McCall in Arkansas.

In 1888, Jack’s great-grandfather John Smith McCall homesteaded 160 acres on the west side of Rock Springs Road near his son George’s farm.

In 1885, Jack’s grandfather Charles Marion Ray homesteaded 120 acres south of Grandview.

In 1884, Betty’s grandfather Thomas Benton Hall purchased 40 acres from the federal government near the Cove Community of Carroll County. A year later, he homesteaded 80 more acres south of Berryville.

In 1883, Betty’s grandfather James Proctor Southerland purchased 40 acres on the Kings River from the federal government. In 1888, he purchased another 40 acres. Between 1888 and 1891, he homesteaded an additional 160 acres that joined his farm.

In 1882, Jack’s grandfather George Robert McCall homesteaded 80 acres on the east side of Rock Springs Road. In 1905, he homesteaded another 40 acres.

In 1860, Betty’s great-grandfather Joseph Calvin Houston purchased 40 acres on the Kings River from the federal government. Between 1882 and 1891, he homesteaded an additional 280 acres on Kings River. It should be noted that the extended Houston family homesteaded 1,760 acres in Carroll and Madison Counties.

In 1857, Jack’s great-grandfather John Smith McCall purchased 40 acres from the federal government in Jackson County.

In 1855, Jack’s great-great-grandfather Josiah McCall purchased 49.17 acres from the federal government in Jackson County. He died five months later at the age of 57.

In 1843, the government completed the first survey of land in the Rockhouse area. The map produced shows that Betty’s great-grandfather Thomas Hall already had an established farm on the banks of the Kings River. He is one of the earliest pioneers to the Ozarks of Arkansas.

Wolves at the Walker Settlement

As you must know by now, I’m interested in accounts of the wolves of Carroll County, Arkansas. This short article appeared in the January 20, 1906 edition of the Berryville Star Progress newspaper. The “Walker Settlement” is located between Berryville and Eureka Springs a little west of the Kings River at the intersection of US Highway 62 and Rock Springs Road (County Road 211). The old Walker School is incorporated into one of the buildings at that location.

The Many Names of Lin McCall

In the Grandview Cemetery of Carroll County, Arkansas stands the tombstone for Lin and Clara McCall.

Lin is a simple enough name, so it’s difficult to explain why his name is recorded as “Harolden S. McCall” in the family Bible.

The 1900 Census has his name spelled Len. The 1910 Census has Lin. His 1910 marriage is registered as Len, but he signed it as Lin. His First World War draft card shows Lindell Harelton (instead of Harolden).

The 1920 Census has simply Lin. The 1930 Census has Len H. The 1940 Census has it back to Lin. For the next draft registration in 1942 he is Len A. McCall, but signed as Lin A. McCall.

In 1977, the Social Security Administration has his name as Lin Harldon McCall. I do not have the sources at hand, but I also have noted that he used the first name spelled as Lindele and the middle name of Hardler.

Oscar Elwood Southerland

The November 9, 1933 edition of the Berryville Star Progress newspaper reported the death of Oscar Elwood Southerland of Rockhouse, Arkansas. He was the second son of Elmer “Ess” Southerland and his wife Jennie Olive Pinkley Southerland. Soon after, Ess Southerland left Arkansas and 1935 records show him living in the Manzanola area of Colorado.